Month: March 2016

A friend and I were talking about choices…

…specifically, how commerce and Madison Avenue have assured that we have too many.  That’s not their intent.   They just want to sell, and pseudo innovation is a company’s way of competing, albeit a questionable one.  The proliferation of consumer choice is everywhere:  food, clothing, drinks (even water!), electronics, service companies, banking, travel, automobiles… But what is the real effect of all this?  It to force on us choices…most of them false, and many stressful.  Apart from the time drain and ubiquitous frustration in making a simple purchase, they set us to question our own judgement, wisdom, knowledge and self esteem.  What if we make the wrong one?  How do we feel when a friend shows us something we like better? My point is not about capitalism, but about choosing to participate (or not) in this game.  All these distractions are just that, distractions from the truly important need to quiet your mind.  Withdrawing from the consumer mindset is one more step down the road to being present and living mindfully.  And simple presence is key to introspection and self-knowledge, and hearing the quiet voice of your own inner wisdom....

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The earth doesn’t care

As an ecologist, I suffer under a certain bi-polarity.  On then one hand, I’m in love with the beauty and fragility and diversity and stunning intricacy of the biosphere.  It pains me to watch as we dismantle its delicate machinery.   On the other hand, I realize the earth itself is oblivious.  She is merely an observer, a tolerant and indifferent host who doesn’t try to control her guests.  She sits in the kitchen playing solitaire while we trash her house:  wreck the furniture, tear out the plumbing, empty the closets and destroy her clothes. Because in the end, she knows time is on her side.  When we are satiated, she’ll simply open the doors sweep us out into the ether…then prepare her next party. The earth has seen it all before.  She’d built and lost environments and civilizations many times before we came along, all in supreme indifference.  Our fear and alarm (where it exists) over destruction of the biosphere is about ourselves, not about the earth. It’s about our hubris in thinking that we are somehow special, the pinnacle of evolution’s achievement (or God’s, per your point of view).  I suppose Tyrannosaurs thought they were special, too.  But all it took to bring them down was a meteor and a few thousand years of nuclear winter....

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Al Fondo del Pacífico

Al fondo del Pacífico Se encuentra lo perdido. Se encuentra lo desusado, Lo mal aprovechado. No hay recogido Del fondo del Pacífico, Solo una eternidad De descanso involuntario. st, 09/2009 Driving down the Santa Cruz coast ___________________ © 2009, R.S. Adamcik adamcikb@pobox.com...

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Fear…

…the greatest regret.  Or, perhaps the source of all regrets?  Fear of “where I dare not go?”  Most of us (I won’t say all) have something we’re afraid of, at some level.  Whatever it is, what’s the worst that could happen should our ultimate fear come true?...

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The singular place where we all come together…

…is in the unknown and the unknowable. Indeed, if as a race we could fall on our knees in wonder, humbled before the incomprehensible transcendence of existence, grateful for the privilege of participating…well, maybe we would lose the ego-driven passions that push us apart and would treat one another with kindness and compassion, mutually aware of our own vulnerability and insignificance....

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When you’re ready for the lesson…

…a teacher comes along. I’m not sure how the universe manages this, but I’ve seen it over and over, sometimes after struggling with something for years.  Maybe we’re really surrounded by teachers all the time, but we’re closed to the lesson being offered until our eyes can see it or our ears can hear.  I don’t know, but I’ve so often found it true. There’s a flip side, of course:  In a lifetime of growth, no single lesson is ever the last one…...

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The whole enchilada…

I’m quoting a favorite counselor here, from a conversation about personal growth.  “Regardless of the issue,” she said, “if you want to deal with it, you have to accept the whole enchilada:  I am who I am.  I am where I am.  It is what it is.” She was absolutely right.  The alternatives are denial or rationalization…or, I guess, continued suffering....

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I think we’re born seeking the Divine…

…something beyond us, a great transcendence, frustrating our desire to conceive of it, to connect.  But neither word nor thought is adequate, and we are left with an inner flame of longing.  In our frustration and inadequacy, we turn to one another, we collaborate, and in so doing have created many constructs that seem to work.  Does that matter?  I don’t know. Perhaps there are many routes to the Divine, and many claim to have found what they sought. But for the restless, the unsatisfied, I think the gnostics had it right:  We are connected already. Perhaps we are dulled to that at birth, and some primordial realization of the loss is what frustrates us, makes us empty and unfulfilled.  In any case, I side with the gnostics.   The way to the Divine is inwards, not outwards.  It is only by going within ourselves that we come to accept our own divinity, and in so doing, find ourselves on the path. But as frustrating as it is not to achieve it, I don’t think connection is the prize.  We’ll get that soon enough.  It’s the journey, the quest, that gives life it’s meaning.  If not, why bother?...

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